blog, News, Nonfiction

It’s Here!

Ta daa! TL; DR: A Redditwriters Mixtape is finally available on Amazon! Head on over to get your copy, and please, please leave reviews (especially if you like it) and spread the word. All proceeds go to charity, so the more people who buy it, the better.

And yes, there will soon be a print version on Createspace. We’re having some difficulties on the technical end of things, so expect that in a few days.

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blog, Nonfiction

Going…Nowhere

Late last fall, Patreon released a WordPress plugin that allows users to integrate Patreon subscriptions into their WordPress-based sites, and since then, I’ve been slowly rethinking how I want to operate this site and my Patreon campaign, and slowly putting things together.

Well, now the process is nearing completion. Soon, I’ll be putting up content exclusively on http://www.selfpluspen.com, and no longer using selfpluspen.wordpress.com. In fact, the new site is already up and basically functional, and you can visit it now—it just needs some tweaking in terms of style, and I haven’t instated the new organizational scheme I’m planning yet, nor added in the new Patreon plugin functionalities. But go on over, see what it’s like!

As for those functionalities, I will be transitioning to a model where I make much of my content available only to Patreon patrons, but will leave some out for non-patrons. I haven’t settled on the final details, but that’s the basic idea.

Best,

David

blog, Fiction, Nonfiction, Uncategorized

Zombie Gangnam Style

A little bit of silliness to start the day:

I was researching proper punctuation with quotation marks, and found these examples:

Bob snorted and said, “I don’t believe in zombies”―right before thirty of them emerged from the tunnel.

Her favorite song was “Gangnam Style”; she spent weeks trying to learn the dance.

Kind of mundane, in the end. I think they could be spruced up a bit:

Bob snorted and said, “I don’t believe in zombies”―right before thirty of them emerged from the tunnel. Their favorite song was “Gangnam Style,” and they had spent weeks trying to learn the dance.

I’m envisioning a gaggle of K-pop-loving undead eager to come out to the world. They decide the best way to do so would be to put together a group choreography, maybe get it filmed and put online in the hopes it’ll go viral, so they work it out and practice and practice and practice, making sure to get all the steps just right. They even find the perfect rehearsal space—a cold, underground room off an abandoned tunnel, where they won’t disturb anyone or be disturbed themselves, and where decomposition will be limited. They work hard, and finally, after weeks, they’re ready to emerge and show the world what they’ve got. And then, when they do, what happens? People like Bob are stunned and everyone thinks there’s a zombie outbreak and panics.

Those poor, rotting souls.

Nonfiction

Two very different uses of sighing

I’m for the moment just posting this because I find it an interesting example of how a single artistic gesture can be used to greatly differing effect in two different works. (Not that this should be surprising; but it’s nice to see it done so well and so differently.)

Anyway, listen to the two songs below:

 

 

 

Hear the sigh each singer uses? How do they make you feel?

Of course, a sigh isn’t just a sigh, nor is it sighed in isolation. The musical context contributes heavily, creating the atmosphere that the sigh breathes. In the case of “John Wayne Gacy, Jr.”, it’s creepy and disturbing; even more so for the way it works with the whole song—thetremulous voice, the quiet, tender melody that worms into your head carrying the initially unremarkable and eventually deeply dark lyrics—to create something profoundly unsettling, and unsettlingly attractive.

Meanwhile, in Buckley’s rendition of “Hallelujah”, there’s a hell of a lot of sex appeal. Buckley notably trims down the lyrics to focus almost exclusively on those pertaining to love and desire. And the inhalation at the beginning, as if Buckley had just been touched for the first time by a long-desired lover…

Nonfiction

A Dime a Dozen

Even the most practiced writers make mistakes. Here’s one I found today, in Slashfilm’s piece “The 28 Best Movies of 2017 So Far“, in a section written by Ethan Anderton:

Romantic comedies are a dime a dozen, and most of them aren’t even worth that 10-cent piece when all is said and done.

Well, no, of course not. If they’re a dime a dozen, then one would be worth about eight tenths of a cent.